Horse riding and D2 Immersion Therapy

My wonderful son, my no.1. In his own world under the water, with Immersion Therapy. The  company is called ‘Determined 2″ or “D2” for short. A place where the sounds are suspended and the only sound to focus on is the sound of your own heartbeat. Under the water. Excited to go and looks forward to it.

I believe. He likes to wear his wetsuit which is tight. A firm pressure sensation for his body. I’m relieved that we found it. A place where we can walk under water. Self confidence is getting better. Great to see. I am glad we found this organisation to  his sensory needs. It has been an. Effort to  start this routine. Hard on me. But I have wanted so much to help him find something that he loves to do. That is his. Something he can relate to and be proud. (Perhaps he just wants to get time off school!) It could turn into an occupational interest down the track.

I am happy. No. 2 Kiddo is finally able to participate in horse riding activities  through another organisation as he loves it. It seems to satisfy the stim that he has. Horseriding addresses the pressure that he needs when seated on a horse. I originally thought satisfying this stim this activity was not possible. It is possible. We have found a way to do it through exploring resources. Although 6 months later he wanted to swim more than ride a horse.

Both boys were riding horses last week. Honestly I think it is one of the best activities to do and learn. I am very pleased. It has been hard work researching to find these activities that are relevant to my children. I am so very pleased that they are doing them.

Horse riding and D2 Immersion Therapy

 

The gloves, play the piano/move your fingers

Bandaids and gloves had to cover his hands. He had scraped  his hands at school. This was too much for a highly sensitised 7 year old. Recently returned from Humid and wet, Darwin.

Flying back to Adelaide Dry weather. A scrape on the hands, he had somehow decided that he would cover his hands with bandaids. Lots of bandaids. Many packets costing a small fortune. The school spoke to me several times about the use and amount of bandaids. Could he please bring his own supply as they needed to keep a supply for other students as well. The bandaids were wretched after some days.  He would not want me to change them. One day I  found that the sticking plaster was caused a rash on his skin. A skin irritation.

This was not helping at all. In a problem solving effort I thought I had come up with a brainwave. I would substitute the bandaids with gloves. It was a comedy of errors. This seemed like a good idea but  turned out to be another hole to fall into.

He loved wearing the gloves. He wore them non-stop for 3 months. I could not buy just any old glove with a mixed fabric material. The material had to be cotton. It had to breathe.  His hands got sweaty from wearing the poly fabric gloves and he did not have the will to explain this to me.

I finally got his gloves off of him to find  his skin peeling . I was not going to sit by and let this phobia he had hurt him so I changed gloves. I realized the material used to make the gloves was making his hands sweaty. It was impossible to  find cotton gloves anywhere. In an effort to dry wet gloves we used a blow dryer, (I’m starting to dig another hole unbeknownst to me! OCD routines were rearing up it’s head).  The hair dryer  had a warming effect on the glove also.  It seems that he also thought he had horrible hands possibly because they felt extra sensitive. An extra teacher was called in at the time to help him understand how he was feeling. Constant wear of gloves poses a few problems when it comes to washing the darned things.

I didn’t understand what was happenning only that I wanted him to be comfortable. Then it seemed to occur that because it had grown cold during the winter months that the gloves had to be warm when he put them on. They were dried in a certain section of the house before he put them on to go to school. (Another localised routine). This went on for quite some time  or there would be loud protestations from Junior. Well, requests to dry the socks started happenning at school! The hair dryer – oh the hair dryer! I just determined I would not put up with it any more and I told him that I was not going to do it any more. He screamed and shouted at me. I feel defeated.  I decided not to assist the set routine.

I did not want him to stop using his hands so we started on the path of challenging him to work his hands and fingers on the piano. Hopefully music will do the trick. Now years later he plays some beautiful pieces on the piano. Thank goodness something has paid off! Piano